CHILDREN’S BOOKS AND “HAPPILY EVER AFTER”

Many of the submissions I receive as an agent are children’s books. I find that inexperienced writers often decide to write a children’s book because they think it is easier than writing for adults. That simply is not true. There is more latitude when writing for adults. Things like change of perspective or point of view, length of text, language and word choice are just some examples. When writing for children, however, there are certain things that will make your manuscript stronger. For example:

1. Keep the first chapter short. By keeping the first chapter short, the writer gives young readers a boost in confidence, a win, a success. Our youngest readers are often intimidated by the length of a book. By keeping the first chapter short, the reader gains immediate gratification and is more likely to tackle subsequent chapters

2. Do solve the main conflict of your story. Open-ended conclusions are fine for adults, but kids—especially young kids—need closure. They need to feel that all is right with the world—their world.

In Mercer Meyer’s classic picture book There’s a Nightmare in my Closet, a young boy is afraid to turn out the lights and go to sleep. He is absolutely positive there is a monster lurking in his closet. He solves the problem by confronting the nightmare—who is afraid of the dark, too—and inviting it under the covers with him. As the two snuggle down to sleep, the boy says, “There might be another nightmare in my closet, but my bed isn’t big enough for three.” That is a satisfying ending.

3. Do have your protagonist solve the main conflict in the story—not a doting auntie or kindly teacher. Give the power to the children—not the adults.

In my young adult novel The Cadence of Gypsies, three high-spirited 17 year olds, with intelligent quotients in the genius range, accompany their teacher and mentor, Carolina Lovel, to Frascati, Italy, a few weeks before they are to graduate from Wood Rose Orphanage and Academy for Young Women. Carolina’s purpose in planning the trip is to remove her gifted, creative students from the Wood Rose campus so they can’t cause any more problems (“expressions of creativity”) for the headmaster, faculty, and other students – which they do with regularity. Carolina also wants to visit the Villa Mondragone where the Voynich Manuscript, the most mysterious document in the world, was first discovered and search how it is related to a paper written in the same script she received on her 18th birthday when she was told that she was adopted. That search will fill in all of the missing pieces of Carolina’s past, but it also allows her students to discover something meaningful within themselves, accept their own pasts, and look forward to the future

4. Do have your protagonist change in some way by the end of the book. He or she should learn something significant about his or herself and the world. Valid changes must be gradual and tied logically to your plot and characterizations

5. Do remember to end your story when it ends. After the climax, when the main conflict is solved or the situation accepted, the story is over. Tie loose ends quickly. At the conclusion of Cinderella the glass slipper fits, crowds cheer, the wicked stepmother is foiled, and Cinderella and her prince live happily ever after. THE END. Readers aren’t the least bit interested in reading about where the prince took Cindy on their honeymoon, what they ate for breakfast, or who cleaned the cinders from the palace hearth.

6. Do offer honesty… and hope. Not every day is a sunny one, but your protagonist should always triumph, should always get what he or she deserves—and so should your villain.

The philosopher Aristotle believed that history shows us things as they are, whereas fiction shows us things as they could be or ought to be. Offer children a satisfying ending in which hope plays a paramount role: that they have the power to change their lives to what could be… and should be.

Next time I will discuss the different types of children’s books, current trends, and what needs to be included for the age they are written.

Thanks for stopping by.

Barbara

THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES GOES ON TOUR

THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES, written for both the adult and new adult markets, will be featured in the virtual book tour by Goddess Fish Promotions on Wednesday, August 28, 2013.  The hosts who will be discussing my book are listed below.  If you get a chance, do stop by and make a comment.  I will be checking in all day and will answer any questions you might have.

A brief description of The Cadence of Gypsies follows:

           

Dara Roux, abandoned when she was 7 years old by her mother.  Exceptionally gifted in foreign languages. Orphan.

Mackenzie Yarborough, no record of her parents or where she was born. Exceptionally gifted in math and problem-solving. Orphan.

Jennifer Torres, both parents killed in an automobile accident when she was 16. Exceptionally gifted in music and art.  Orphan.

Three high-spirited 17 year olds, with intelligent quotients in the genius range, accompany their teacher and mentor, Carolina Lovel, to Frascati, Italy, a few weeks before they are to graduate from Wood Rose Orphanage and Academy for Young Women.  Carolina’s purpose in planning the trip is to remove her gifted, creative students from the Wood Rose campus located in Raleigh, North Carolina, so they can’t cause any more problems (“expressions of creativity”) for the headmaster, faculty, and other students – which they do with regularity.  Carolina also wants to visit the Villa Mondragone where the Voynich Manuscript, the most mysterious document in the world, was first discovered and search how it is related to a paper written in the same script she received on her 18th birthday when she was told that she was adopted – a search, more dangerous than she could have imagined, that will fill in all of the missing pieces of her past and help each of her students to discover something meaningful within themselves.

For more information about The Cadence of Gypsies, visit www.barbaracaseyagency.com Available from Amazon.com and selected for Amazon’s List of Best Reads.

HOSTS FOR THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES VIRTUAL BOOK TOUR
1
 Blood Red Shadows
Full Moon Dreaming
LizaOConnor
Out of the Lockbox
Danita Minnis
Writer Wonderland
Reading In Twilight
Andi’s Young Adult Books
Sexy Adventures, Passionate Tales
10
 Reviews by Crystal
11 
Cabin Goddess
12 
Lisa Haselton’s Reviews and Interviews
13 
You Gotta Read Reviews
14 
On the Broomstick
15 
My Devotional Thoughts
16 
Dawn’s Reading Nook Blog
17 
Deal Sharing Aunt
18 
My Odd Little World
19 
Hope Dreams. Life… Love
20 
Dalene’s Book Reviews
21
 The Cerebral Writer
22 
Chris Redding Author
23 
The (Mis)Adventures of a Twenty-Something Year Old Girl
24 
Red Wine and Books
25 
A Writer’s Life
26 
The Simple Things in Life
27
 Bunny’s Review
28 
Farm Girl Books
29 
Renee Luke
30 
Nickie’s Views and Interviews
31 
Who’s Reviews
32 
Fiction Writing and Other Oddities
33 
Andi’s Book Reviews
34 
Wake Up Your Wild Side
35 
Hope Dreams. Life… Love
36 
fuonlyknew
37 
Musings and Ramblings
38 
Sharing Links and Wisdom
39 
Becky Flade Author


AMAZON SELECTS THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES FOR ITS 2013 LIST OF BEST BOOKS

THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES, written for both young adult and adult readers, has been selected by Amazon for its “2013 List of Best Books.” This is especially nice since it was totally unexpected.

A brief description of THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES is as follows:

Three high-spirited 17 year olds, with intelligent quotients in the genius range, accompany their teacher and mentor, Carolina Lovel, to Frascati, Italy, a few weeks before they are to graduate from Wood Rose Orphanage and Academy for Young Women. Carolina’s purpose in planning the trip is to remove her gifted, creative students from the Wood Rose campus located in Raleigh, North Carolina, so they can’t cause any more problems (“expressions of creativity”) for the headmaster, faculty, and other students – which they do with regularity. Carolina also wants to visit the Villa Mondragone where the Voynich Manuscript, the most mysterious document in the world, was first discovered and search how it is related to a paper written in the same script she received on her 18th birthday when she was told that she was adopted – a search that will take them into the mystical world of gypsy tradition and magic, more dangerous and exciting than any of them could have imagined.

The storyline is woven around the ancient Voynich Manuscript and the mysterious Kaulo Camioes, black gypsies, in a contemporary setting that takes place between Raleigh, North Carolina, and Frascati, Italy. All of the facts concerning the Voynich are accurate, as are the facts relating to gypsy customs, beliefs, and practices. The story itself is fiction.

I had a tremendous amount of fun researching the Voynich, as well as gypsies for whom I have a new-found respect and understanding. If you get a chance to read THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES over the summer, I would love to hear what you think of it.

Barbara

 

 

Barbara Casey,Author/Literary Agent, Will Read from her Latest Novel, THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES

I will read from my latest novel, THE CADENCE OF GYPSIES, on Saturday, February 25, starting at 1 pm, at the Chatooga County Library in Summerville, Georgia. The public is invited.

CADENCE OF GYPSIES Summary:
On her 18th birthday Carolina Lovel learned that she was adopted and was given a letter written in an unknown language left to her by her birth mother. After years of research she travels to Italy on a mission to find the truth about her past. Carolina is accompanied by three extremely gifted but mischievous students—the FIGs—from Wood Rose Orphanage and Academy for Young Women. In an effort to help their favorite teacher, the FIGs will have to use their special abilities to decipher the Voynich Manuscript, the most mysterious document in the world and the one thing that is strangely similar to what Carolina was given as a child. Their search will take them into the mystical world of gypsy tradition and magic, more exciting and dangerous than any of them could have imagined.